American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists

Presents

An AASECT New York Metro Section Conference

HEALTHY SEXUALITY
IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Hosted by and at

Department of Health & Physical Education
Fashion Institute of Technology
State University of New York (SUNY)
Seventh Avenue at 27th Street, NYC

Date: Saturday, October 16, 1999
Time: 8:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

   Approved for APA and AASECT CEs             
Also Accepted for Nurses’ Recertification

 


Conference Theme

There have been many innovations and breakthroughs in sexuality that have been having a positive impact upon previously difficult-to-treat sexual dysfunctions, e.g., Viagra for impotence, the coital alignment technique for sexual dysfunctions and other problems, body psychotherapy for similar problems, and so on. Over the years, there have also been a wide range of topics that have not been adequately dealt with before, such as black sexuality, sexuality and the mentally ill, heterophobia, among others. Recent studies have indicated that sexual dysfunctions (e.g., female anorgasmia, inhibited sexual desire, impotence, and premature ejaculation) are epidemic in our society. The rising incidence of breast cancer and other diseases that impact greatly upon sexual functioning and body image, and the issues concerning diversity and multiculturalism as they affect sexuality need to be addressed. In addition, there will be luncheon slide presentations, lectures, and discussions about the impact of sexual images in the media, including fashion, art, dance, and virtual environments.

In an era of HIV, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted diseases, and the prevalence of harassment, abuse, and litigation as the focus of public policy on sexuality, it is important to bring attention back to the positive aspects of sexuality that can contribute to creating healthier, happier, and more cohesive marriages and families and individuals. Many conferences that have addressed issues of sexuality have not focused on problems that are both chronic and universal, in spite of the fact that there have been major breakthroughs in these areas with wide relevance to all.

 


PROGRAM

Registration, Continental Breakfast, and Exhibits
7:30-8:30am Conference Committee: Erica Goodstone, Ph.D., Chair; Raymond J. Noonan, Ph.D.; Valerie Marie Orridge, R.N., M.A.; Edward W. Eichel, M.A.

 

WELCOME

Dr. Joyce Brown, President, F.I.T./SUNY

8:30-8:45am

Moderator: Erica Goodstone, Ph.D.

 


 

OPENING PLENARY PANEL (1¾ hrs.)


Breakthroughs in Sexuality

8:45-10:30am

Moderator: Alice Kahn Ladas, Ed.D.

 

Viagra—A Urologist’s Perspective: Is Sex Worth Dying For? and A New Definition of Safe Sex

8:45-9:00am

E. Douglas Whitehead, M.D., F.A.C.S., author of Viagra—The Wonder Drug for Peak Performance, 1999; editorial assistant, Medical Aspects of Human Sexuality; medical advisor, Impotents Anonymous and I-ANON chapters (American Cancer Society, NYC); prominent researcher and presenter on the efficacy of drugs (e.g., Proscar and Viagra), prostheses, hormones, etc., for impotence and other sexual dysfunctions.

Abstract:
Viagra has resulted in sexual function for millions of men due to its pill form, efficacy, and safety. This has: (1) changed delivery of initial treatment of erectile dysfunction from urologists to non-urologists, and (2) changed the diagnostic algorithm. However, all the treatment methods existing before the age of Viagra still have important roles to play. These issues, and the indications, side effects, and cautions for Viagra use will be reviewed. (Handouts will be provided.)
Learning Objectives:
  1. Gain knowledge of Viagra’s efficacy and safety.
  2. Understand the role Viagra plays in treatment of erectile dysfunction vis-à-vis other treatment choices.
  3. Understand the importance of a diagnostic work-up for the etiology of the erectile dysfunction.

 

Sex Therapy: Viagra Update

9:00-9:15am

Michael Perelman, Ph.D., acting co-director and clinical assistant professor of psychiatry, Human Sexuality Program, NY Presbyterian Hospital, Weill College of Cornell University, NYC; author of numerous papers in professional journals, including, "The Future Is Now: A Coordinated Approach to Restoring Sexual Health, in Cancer and Sexual Function," Contemporary Urology, 11(4), 102, April 1999; frequent presenter/keynote speaker.

Abstract:
This presentation illustrates how sex therapy may be integrated with the new sexual pharmaceuticals when treating erectile dysfunction (ED). The expanding role of sex therapists in educating both the public and primary care physicians is described. How sex therapy techniques can improve the effectiveness of these pharmaceuticals will be delineated. Descriptions of how these new sexual pharmaceutical agents can be used adjunctively to improve sex therapy when treating ED will be emphasized.

A decade ago, integrating antidepressants and cognitive behavior therapy became the treatment of choice for many depressed patients who were otherwise resistant to improvement by traditional unilateral approaches. We have extrapolated that model to adjunctively using sildenafil (Viagra) and other pharmaceuticals to accelerate treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Pharmaceuticals can be used to facilitate the management of patient resistance as well as to bypass the pejorative effects of a recalcitrant partner. These issues will be summarized with examples reflecting individual as well as conjoint treatment. As new pharmaceutical agents are developed and approved for men and women, opportunities to educate and assist people in restoring their sexual health will only increase for all of us.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn how sex therapy techniques can improve the effectiveness of the new sexual pharmaceutical agents.
  2. Learn how the new sexual pharmacological agents can adjunctively improve sex therapy outcomes in difficult cases.

 

Newly Recognized Pathways in Sexual Response

9:15-9:30am

Barry Komisaruk, Ph.D., professor, Institute of Animal Behavior Dept. and Psychology Dept., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; author of numerous professional journal articles, including, "Love as a Sensory Stimulation: Physiological Effects of Its Deprivation and Expression." Psychoneuroimmunology, in press, co-authored with Beverly Whipple, 1999.

Abstract:
The role of a recently discovered genital sensory pathway (via the vagus nerves) that bypasses the spinal cord and enters the brain directly will be discussed in the context of other neural pathways that mediate sexual, pain-blocking, hormonal, and autonomic responses to genital stimulation in female mammals, including women.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn about the behavioral, autonomic, and endocrine responses to stimulation of the reproductive system in females.
  2. Discover which nerves provide sensory innervation of the reproductive system in females.
  3. Understand how you can account for reports of sexual response, including orgasm, by women who have a clinical diagnosis of "complete" spinal cord injury.

 

The New Intercourse: Is the Coital Alignment Technique Freud’s Grail of Inner Space?

9:30-9:45am

Edward W. Eichel, M.A., psychotherapist with couples to improve sexual compatibility, private practice, NYC; author of The Perfect Fit: How to Achieve Mutual Fulfillment and Monogamous Passion Through the New Intercourse, 1992.

Abstract:
Documentation from moving pictures showing intercourse and a training video on the Coital Alignment Technique (CAT) validates Freud’s vaginal orgasm and counters an anti-coitus bias that impedes the development of sexology.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn the position of coital alignment and the principle of coordinated movement in sexual alignment.
  2. Learn the anatomic factors that constitute complete genital contact in coital alignment.
  3. Learn how unaligned intercourse causes common problems of sexual dysfunction that are an inevitable syndrome.

 

What Is Female Ejaculation, Anyway?

9:45-10:00am

John Perry, Ph.D., FAACS, biofeedback therapist; co-author of The G Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About Human Sexuality, with Beverly Whipple and Alice Ladas, 1993; author of numerous papers and a presenter at many conferences.

Abstract:
When the concept of "female ejaculation" was first presented at AASECT and SSSS meetings two decades ago, we debated whether it should be measured in "teaspoons" or "tablespoons." But there was little debate over initial chemical assays, which showed the fluid to be quite distinguishable from ordinary urine, and similar to male ejaculate. In the past decade, however, learning how to "female ejaculate" has become an objective of certain feminist groups, and a "more is better" theme has emerged. Voluminous "ejaculations," sometimes called "gushing," are now considered virtuous on the Internet, and little concern has been shown for the origins of the fluid expelled. But recent evidence suggests that some of these copious fluids may originate in the bladder after all.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand the differences between the original and the now-popular concepts of "female ejaculation."
  2. Suggest research strategies that may help answer the question, "What is female ejaculation, anyway?"

 

Questions & Answers

10:00-10:30am

 

 

Exhibits Break

10:30-11:00am

 

 


 

CONCURRENT SESSION NO. 1 (1½ hrs.)

Session A: Panel


Health, Disease, and Sexuality

11:00am-12:30pm

Moderator: Jean Tepsic, Ph.D.

 

Sexually Transmitted Infections

11:00-11:15am

Kathleen Thomsen, M.D., M.P.H., medical director, Planned Parenthood Federation of America; clinical assistant professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey—Robert Wood Johnson Medical School; author of numerous papers in professional journals on women’s health, and frequent presenter.

Abstract:
Dr. Thomsen will discuss the psychosexual issues that confront individuals with a sexually transmissible infection.
Learning Objective:
  1. Identify at least two sexual issues that infected individuals confront as a result of their infection.

 

Sexual Abuse—Courageous Survivors

11:15-11:30am

Arlene Mehlman, L.C.S.W., M.S.W., M.S., psychotherapist in private practice for 25 years; facilitated various workshops for mental health professionals; guest on several radio shows; adjunct instructor, Dept. of Health & Physical Education, Fashion Institute of Technology.

Abstract:
"There’s more than anger, more than sadness, more than terror. There’s hope." (Edith Horning, 46-year-old survivor). Whether you are the survivor, family member, or friend of a survivor—you are affected. Knowledge, understanding, and compassion are the first steps in the healing process.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Clarify what constitutes sexual abuse.
  2. Understand the profile of the sexual abuse survivor and his/her use of multiple personality disorder (MPD), substance abuse, self-medication, etc., to ameliorate the pain.
  3. Understand the recovery process.

 

Sexuality and Female Breast Cancer Survivors

11:30-11:45am

Valerie Marie Orridge, R.N., M.A., sex educator for Psychiatry Residency Education/Training Program, Harlem Hospital, NYC; sexuality educator for the mentally ill, Harlem House, NYC; frequent presenter at professional associations and community groups.

Abstract:
Female breast cancer survivors have been severely traumatized by a mastectomy or a modification thereof. The purpose of this presentation is to identify those influences within our society that cause many female breast cancer survivors to approach sexuality with trepidation. The emphasis will be on how to help the survivors to become more comfortable with their sexuality. Exploration of the positive aspects that survivors bring to their sexual encounter will be highlighted. There will also be a brief focus on a variety of methods that will assist survivors in explaining the surgery to a new partner.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify some influences in society that impact upon body image.
  2. Understand the importance of helping female breast cancer survivors explore their sexuality assets.
  3. Help survivors develop comfortable methods of surgery explanation to a new partner.

 

Sexuality and the Mentally Ill

11:45-12:00pm

Louise Ingrid Hodge, M.S., director, Harlem House Psychosocial Club, Northern Manhattan Network, Harlem Hospital Center, Department of Psychiatry.

Abstract:
The mentally ill is one of the populations that society does not find appropriate for sexual activity (others include the elderly, disabled, etc.). Consequently, most facilities do not have a sexuality education program in place. Most mentally ill persons are stabilized on medications, and a large percentage is sexually active. This presentation is designed to help participants understand and explore the need to include this special-needs population in sexuality education.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify how cultural influences shape attitudes of sexuality exemption for certain populations, such as the mentally ill.
  2. Identify how staff contribute to the belief that sexuality education would be a problem for the mentally ill.
  3. Understand why sexuality education is important for all populations.

 

Body Metaphors, Touch, and Healthy Sexuality

12:00-12:15pm

Erica Goodstone, Ph.D., chair, AASECT NY Metro Area Section; professor, chair, Dept. of Health & Physical Education, Fashion Institute of Technology; author of "Sexual Reawakening" chapter in Healing Journeys: The Power of Rubenfeld Synergy; numerous articles in professional journals and newsletters, including "The Use of Touch in Mental Health Counseling: Appropriate or Not?" American Mental Health Counselors Association AMHCA Advocate.

Abstract:
Our bodily symptoms often reveal to us something about the way we think. The way we think and feel, in turn, affects the health of our bodies. Changing the metaphors by which we live our lives can literally heal our bodies. As our bodies heal, we become more open and receptive to giving and receiving touch. Studies have shown that touch decreases stress, lowers blood pressure, decreases anxiety, and decreases depression. Loving touch, in turn, often leads to more satisfying, healthy sexuality.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Become familiar with common metaphors used to describe stressful emotions related to specific areas of the body.
  2. Learn about current research indicating the healing effects of touch.
  3. Understand how changing body metaphors, and giving and receiving touch can lead to more satisfying, healthy sexuality.

 

Questions & Answers

12:15-12:30pm

 

 

Session B: Workshop


Body Psychotherapy, Bioenergetic Analysis, and Sexuality

11:00am-12:30pm

Alice Kahn Ladas, Ed.D., licensed psychologist; marital, family, and sex therapist; and bioenergetic analyst practising in Manhattan, NY, and Santa Fe, NM; author of Women and Bioenergetic Analysis, 1980; co-author of The G Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About Human Sexuality, with Beverly Whipple and John Perry, 1993.

Abstract:
This workshop is an introduction to body psychotherapy, what it is, how it evolved, and its relevance to sexual functioning. A didactic verbal introductory segment will be followed by a video of one type of body psychotherapy, Bioenergetic Analysis, as practiced by its founder, Dr. Alexander Lowen. Participants will then have a chance to experience some bodywork personally in a group. The workshop will end with questions and discussion.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand what body psychotherapy is.
  2. Learn when and how body psychotherapy evolved.
  3. Determine whether body psychotherapy is useful in the treatment of sexual problems.
Workshop Agenda:

11:00-11:20am

History of body psychotherapy, how it evolved, and its relevance to sexuality. Handout: Short selective bibliography about body psychotherapy.

11:20-11:40am

Video of Dr. Lowen working with a client.

11:40am-12:15pm

Bioenergetic bodywork—experiential.

12:15-12:30pm

Questions and Discussion.

 

Session C: Workshop


Cultures and Sexualities

11:00am-12:30pm

Robert T. Francoeur, Ph.D., A.C.S., author or editor of 30 books, including the award-winning International Encyclopedia of Sexuality (vols. 1-3, 1997; vols. 4 and 5 in preparation).

Abstract:
This workshop will focus on cultural differences and similarities in religious views of sexuality, sexuality information sources and education, and changing patterns of sex, marriage, and family. Examples will be drawn from 32 countries on six continents.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand the key elements in our social ecosystem promoting the tidal wave of changes in our sexual cultures worldwide.
  2. Develop an awareness of conflicting world views and their impact on sexuality values, education, counseling, and therapy
  3. Develop skills in communicating with persons whose views of sexuality differ radically from their own.
Workshop Agenda:

11:00am-11:30am

Sources of Religious Conflicts in Sexuality.

11:00-11:15am

Summary of Fixed Versus Process Views.

11:15-11:30am

Communications Exercise, Fixed Versus Process.

11:30am-12:00pm

Sources of Sexuality Information and Education.

11:30-11:45am

Summary of Cultural Similarities and Differences.

11:45am-12:00pm

Communications Exercise.

12:00pm-12:30pm

A Revolution in Sex, Love, and Marriage.

12:00-12:15pm

Summary of Cultural Variations.

12:15-12:30pm

Group Discussion of Sex, Love, and Marriage in the 21st Century.

 

Exhibits Break

12:30-1:00pm

 

 

Luncheon Buffet

1:00-1:45pm

 

 


 

LUNCHEON PLENARY PANEL (1¾ hrs.)


Fashion, Media, Art, and Sexuality

1:45-3:30pm

Moderator: Edward Eichel, M.A.

 

Sex and Fashion

1:45-2:00pm

Valerie Steele, Ph.D., chief curator, The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology; author of numerous books, including Fifty Years of Fashion, New Look to Now, 1997, and Fetish, Fashion, Sex and Power, 1996.

Abstract:
An analysis of certain fashions regarded as sexy, including high-heeled shoes, corsets, and lingerie, as well as materials such as leather, satin, and rubber. A brief history of the incorporation of erotic themes in fashion design and advertising.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Investigate the concept of sexual fashion.
  2. Learn more about the history of fashion.
  3. Explore the significance of erotic symbolism and fetishes in fashion.

 

Male Seductive Images

2:00-2:15pm

Ruth Rubinstein, Ph.D., sociologist, social science professor, Fashion Institute of Technology; author of Society’s Child: Identity, Clothing and Style, 1999, and Dress Codes: Meanings and Messages in American Culture, 1995.

Abstract:
Many cultural forces have affected male seductive appearance. Through lecture and a series of slides, the fantasy images of men in the media (comic books, movies, etc.) will be explored and implications of the effect of these images on men in their bread-winning role and in their sexuality will be discussed.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Introduce participants to the cultural forces that affect male seductive appearance.
  2. Encourage awareness of sexuality as an element of the male gender role.
  3. Promote self-development through a more focused "reading" of masculine depictions in comic books and in the movies.

 

Sex and the Single Spider: Changing Gender Roles in Dance

2:15-2:30pm

Jean Tepsic, Ph.D., adjunct dance instructor, Dept. of Health & Physical Education, Fashion Institute of Technology; author of Accreditation Manual and numerous papers in professional journals.

Abstract:
This paper considers the changing representations of the sex roles in dance, demonstrated by Giselle and The Cage. These two ballets, a century apart, serve as examples of opposite viewpoints on the nature of woman’s sexuality and man’s relationship to it.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand how art disciplines affect and reflect the sex roles of any given culture and era.
  2. Gain an understanding of the media in dance that are used to convey these changes.
  3. Gain insight into identifying the ways that these changes are conveyed in today’s dance works.

 

Sex in the City: Lovers in Rome, New York, and Paris

2:30-2:45pm

Vincent Arcilesi, artist, professor, Art & Design Division, Fashion Institute of Technology; exhibitor at numerous galleries, including the Broome Street Gallery, NYC, 1997, 2/20 Gallery, NYC, 1996.

Abstract:
My work reflects two great passions of my life, the human figure and the landscape. I try to portray the nude form, both female and male, in all its sensuous glory. I have painted figure compositions since 1964 and started painting landscapes on site in 1966. Over the years, the two strains have become intermingled so that many of my large paintings depict nude figures in various landscapes, mythic as well as real. In my last three solo shows, the sensual clothed and unclothed figures appear in the landscapes and cityscapes of Italy, New York, and Paris.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand an artist’s view of sensual clothed and unclothed figures in the landscapes and cityscapes, mythic as well as real, of Italy, New York, and Paris.
  2. Determine whether lovers in a painting seem more sensual clothed or nude.
  3. Understand how the color of the paintings add to the sensuality.

 

From Columbine to Fashion to Virtual Reality: Toward a Holistic Sexual Ecology I

2:45-3:00pm

Raymond J. Noonan, Ph.D., adjunct instructor, Dept. of Health & Physical Education, Fashion Institute of Technology; director, webmaster, SexQuest/The Sex Institute, NYC; author of Does Anyone Still Remember When Sex Was Fun? Positive Sexuality in the Age of AIDS (3rd ed.), 1996, and other writings; frequent presenter at professional conferences and Internet personality (http://www.SexQuest.com).

Abstract:
Despite all indications to the contrary, policymakers in almost all fields of endeavor continue to address human sexuality factors as fragmented pieces of a limited puzzle. The results of this kind of thinking are equally fragmented, in that solutions to problems are often addressed as if they have no relationship to other aspects of human environments or even to normative healthy sexuality. The human sexuality complex was conceived to reflect the fact that our sexuality is a complex and often chaotic system operating with multiple feedback mechanisms that changes both itself and other systems in our environment. Fashion and the media are examples where systems insights would be beneficial, as I have recently shown with regard to the Internet. On the other hand, no explanations of violence in our schools have even hinted at components related to sexuality as being potentially either causative or ameliorative. This presentation will provide a foundation for my afternoon follow-up session.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Recognize and understand the nature and importance of systems perspectives in sexological investigations.
  2. Identify several examples of how we presently address human sexuality factors and suggest how they could benefit from holistic systems thinking.
  3. Define the human sexuality complex and why it was conceptualized to guide both research and public policy concerns.

 

Questions & Answers

3:00-3:30pm

 

 

Coffee & Exhibits Break

3:30-4:00pm

 

 


 

CONCURRENT SESSION NO. 2 (1½ hrs.)

Session D: Panel


Sexual Identity, Diversity, Technology, and Other Sexuality Issues

4:00-5:30pm

Moderator: Raymond J. Noonan, Ph.D.

 

A Critical Look at Censorship of Sexuality Information Online

4:00-4:15pm

Coralie Meade Rodriguez, M.A., online technologies coordinator, SIECUS (Sexuality Information and Education Council of the U.S.).

Abstract:
Online technologies allow any computer user to reach a larger world of information than ever before. As with any new technological advance, the advantages must be balanced with the disadvantages. By not being informed about the technologies that filter and block information, we do not maintain access to important sexual health information online.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand the fundamental differences between the Internet and other types of media.
  2. Gain an understanding of the key issues and arguments in the current debate over balancing child safety with restricting children’s access to sexually explicit material and sexuality information online.

 

New Insights into Transgender Phenomena

4:15-4:30pm

Robert T. Francoeur, Ph.D., A.C.S., author or editor of 30 books, including the award-winning International Encyclopedia of Sexuality (vols. 1-3, 1997; vols. 4 and 5 in preparation).

Abstract:
A brief description of the pivotal role of 34-year-old John/Joan/John in the current debate over the rights, personal autonomy, and ethical health care of intersex or hermaphrodite infants and adults. How this and a second intersex case led to the Intersex Society of North America. Why we can’t resolve this social, psychological, and medical conundrum.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand some of the social, medical, and ethical issues in the classic intersex case of John/Joan/John.
  2. Begin to understand the conundrum intersex persons and health care professionals face in 1999 as a result of the new challenges brought to the public by Hermaphrodites with Attitudes and the Intersex Society of North America.

 

Sex and Autobiography

4:30-4:45pm

Bill Mooney, Ph.D., English professor, Fashion Institute of Technology; author of numerous books, several made into screenplays, including, Corazon, a novel, developed as a film by HBO, 1995-96, The Line-Up, 1994-95, and Against Her Will, 1995, original screenplays.

Abstract:
Discuss "Notes on My Mother," a brief essay by Hilton Als, to consider: a) the place of sexuality in the autobiographical quest to discover identity, b) its increased importance when the writer’s sex-role is perceived as aberrant, and c) the role of autobiographical writing in discovering (sexual) identity.
Learning Objective:
  1. Understand the place of sexuality in the autobiographical quest to discover identity.

 

Sex and Autobiography

4:45-5:00pm

Stan Solomon, Ph.D., English professor, Fashion Institute of Technology; author of several academic papers, including, "Writing Across the Curriculum in a Two Year College," 1996, and "William Dean Howells and ‘The Amigo’: Defending a Bad Boy," 1995.

Abstract:
Talk about the increased use of explicit sexuality in the memoir form in recent years, and some of the implications it has for student autobiographical writing.
Learning Objective:
  1. Discover some implications for student autobiographical writing of the increased use of explicit sexuality in the memoir in recent years.

 

From Columbine to Fashion to Virtual Reality: Toward a Holistic Sexual Ecology II

5:00-5:15pm

Raymond J. Noonan, Ph.D., adjunct instructor, Dept. of Health & Physical Education, Fashion Institute of Technology; director, webmaster, SexQuest/The Sex Institute, NYC; author of Does Anyone Still Remember When Sex Was Fun? Positive Sexuality in the Age of AIDS (3rd ed.), 1996, and other writings; frequent presenter at professional conferences and Internet personality (http://www.SexQuest.com).

Abstract:
The human sexuality complex was conceived to reflect the fact that our sexuality is a complex and often chaotic system operating with multiple feedback mechanisms that changes both itself and other systems in our environment. Sexual ecology is conceived as a branch of environmental studies that ought to examine the human sexuality complex and its impact on the lives of human and other organisms and their psychosocial and biocultural environments. Systems sexologists are needed who can adequately identify and understand the various components that may interact, and who can help to quantify both the past and potential future interactions among them to help guide better public policy development. Cutting-edge issues in sexology, such as heterophobia and sexual harassment public policy excesses, will be presented to explore the possibilities of a renewed "Sane Sex" paradigm of positive sexuality on sexual health. This presentation is a follow up and expansion of the earlier plenary address.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand and define the concept of sexual ecology and its importance in addressing various public policy concerns.
  2. Identify the steps that might be taken to expand the role that systems sexologists have in informing public policy.
  3. Identify some of the current issues in our sexual environment that reflect our failures in public policy and how they might be remedied with a Sane Sex systems approach.

 

Questions & Answers

5:15-5:30pm

 

 

Session E: Workshop


Black Sexuality: American Historical and Cultural Influences

4:00-5:30pm

Valerie Marie Orridge, R.N., M.A., sex educator for Psychiatry Residency Education/Training Program, Harlem Hospital, NYC; sexuality educator for the mentally ill, Harlem House, NYC; frequent presenter at professional associations and community groups.

Abstract:
A review of the American history that relates to the black experience, sexuality, and pertinent issues is necessary in order to understand why and how black sexuality is deeply rooted in American history, and why it must be viewed within this context. This presentation is designed to help participants understand that the circumstances under which the black American population has lived in America cannot be evaluated by Eurocentric standards.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand the slavery experience and its relationship to black sexuality.
  2. Understand stereotypical images and its influence on the black self-image.
  3. Understand the black experience transgenerational syndrome and its impact on contemporary black Americans.
Workshop Agenda:

4:00-4:15pm

Historical review of the black experience in America and its impact on black sexuality.

4:15-4:30pm

Excerpts from "Ethnic Notions," filmed at the University of Berkeley, California. This film depicts stereotypical cartoons, commercials, and art works that have impacted on the self-image and sexuality of black Americans.

4:30-4:45pm

Segregation, alienation, deprivation, and the quest for identity.

4:45-5:00pm

"The Psychological Residuals of Slavery." Kenneth V. Hardy, Ph.D., University of Syracuse, offers an explanation of how the slavery experience is transgenerational, and discusses its impact on race relations and black sexuality in contemporary America.

5:00-5:20pm

Questions, Answers, and Discussion.

5:20-5:30pm

Evaluation Forms for Participants.

 

Session F: Workshop


Sexual Reawakening Through Touch, Touch Therapy, and Body Psychotherapy

4:00-5:30pm

Erica Goodstone, Ph.D., chair, AASECT NY Metro Area Section; professor, chair, Dept. of Health & Physical Education, Fashion Institute of Technology; author of "Sexual Reawakening" chapter in Healing Journeys: The Power of Rubenfeld Synergy; numerous articles in professional journals and newsletters, including "The Use of Touch in Mental Health Counseling: Appropriate or Not?" American Mental Health Counselors Association AMHCA Advocate.

Abstract:
Sexuality is intrinsic, not separate from our bodies and our lives. Beginning with an overview of the types of touch therapy and body psychotherapy available, this workshop will focus on ways that our bodies hold onto and release tensions. We will discover how these tensions may manifest as sexual dysfunctions and other sexual problems. Participants will have an opportunity to practice different types of touch. A body psychotherapy demonstration with a willing participant will help participants to understand the benefits of this approach as an adjunct to traditional sex therapy.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Explain the different categories of touch therapy and body psychotherapy methods.
  2. Recognize body armoring in the various bodily segments.
  3. Understand how sexual issues may manifest in the body/mind system and how body psychotherapy can help clients to alleviate sexual dysfunctions.
Workshop Agenda:

4:00-4:35pm

Lecture explaining seven categories of touch therapy/body psychotherapy methods.

4:35-4:40pm

Manifestation of Sexual Issues in the Body/Mind System.

4:40-5:00pm

Participants will practice some simple touching techniques utilizing gentle, safe, non-sexual, respectful touch (on shoulders, arms, back, and neck).

5:00-5:20pm

Body psychotherapy demonstration with a volunteer, indicating how this can be a useful adjunct to traditional sex therapy.

5:20-5:30pm

Questions and Answers.

 

Last Chance to See Exhibits

5:30-6:00pm

 

 


CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR PROFESSIONALS

This program meets the requirements of the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT) and is approved for 6.5 CEs. These CEs may be applied toward AASECT certification and renewal of certification.

The American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists is approved by the American Psychological Association to offer continuing education for psychologists. The American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists maintains responsibility for the program.

Nursing agencies will accept APA CEs for recertification.

 


Go to Registration Form and Directions to F.I.T.

 


 

For Further Information

Dr. Erica Goodstone, Conference Coordinator
Phone: 212-217-7948, E-mail: DrEricaG@aol.com
http://www.aasect.org/NYMetro.htm


For the most recent program updates, please go to:
Dr. Ray Noonan's SexQuest Website

 


Sponsored by the AASECT New York Metro Section of the
American Assocation of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT).

With additional support from the Fashion Institute of Technology of the
State University of New York (FIT-SUNY)
.

Partial funding for this conference provided by an
educational grant from Pfizer Corporation.

Web Design and Typesetting Services donated by
ParaGraphic Artists, NYC.


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